Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu’s Message about World Mental Health Day 2014
at c|change, we’re fortunate to have the opportunity to work with many wonderful clients. One of whom we’re very proud of is the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH)—a client we’ve partnered with for several years.
So, when we were made aware that Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu had released a letter in support of WFMH’s 2014 World Mental Health Day, we jumped (quickly!) at the chance to get his letter up on the WFMH website. Please take a moment to read why Archbishop Desmond Tutu “wholeheartedly supports the 2014 World Mental Health Day theme, ‘Living with Schizophrenia” and how you too can join him in celebrating this important day on October 10. 

Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu’s Message about World Mental Health Day 2014

at c|change, we’re fortunate to have the opportunity to work with many wonderful clients. One of whom we’re very proud of is the World Federation for Mental Health (WFMH)—a client we’ve partnered with for several years.

So, when we were made aware that Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu had released a letter in support of WFMH’s 2014 World Mental Health Day, we jumped (quickly!) at the chance to get his letter up on the WFMH website. Please take a moment to read why Archbishop Desmond Tutu “wholeheartedly supports the 2014 World Mental Health Day theme, ‘Living with Schizophrenia” and how you too can join him in celebrating this important day on October 10. 

A “Ruff” Time at the Sox Game

A group of c|changers went out to enjoy some baseball, beers and brats on Monday night in support of the the Anti-Cruelty Society. The White Sox defeated the Oakland A’s at US Cellular Field, making the evening a win-win for the fans AND the pups. 

California Dreams Made Reality at c|change
Today is a very exciting day for c|change: we have an official office set up in Venice, California!
As c|change owner Hugh Schulze (pictured above left) said about the company expansion, “Every journey starts with a single step.” And everyone is very excited about the step to plant some West Coast roots—-especially Tomas Bulva (c|change web developer extraordinaire, pictured right). He recently relocated to sunny California (from not-so-sunny Chicago) to head up the new location.
Cheers to a new chapter of growth and success at c|change! The journey continues…

California Dreams Made Reality at c|change

Today is a very exciting day for c|change: we have an official office set up in Venice, California!

As c|change owner Hugh Schulze (pictured above left) said about the company expansion, “Every journey starts with a single step.” And everyone is very excited about the step to plant some West Coast roots—-especially Tomas Bulva (c|change web developer extraordinaire, pictured right). He recently relocated to sunny California (from not-so-sunny Chicago) to head up the new location.

Cheers to a new chapter of growth and success at c|change! The journey continues…

Play with Fire and You Get Burned. Watch Other People Play with Fire and You Have Fun. 

The 2014 theme at c|change is based on the element of fire. Fire as a process that transforms and stimulates growth. Doing some preliminary field work for how this theme will manifest for the rest of the year and into the holidays, a few c|change team members went to a Chicago Full Moon Jam at Foster Beach along Lake Michigan. 

According to the Full Moon Jam site, here’s some information about the monthly performance:

The Full Moon Jams’ unite performing artists and spectators through a love and appreciation of fire art. Encompassing myriad performance styles and tools, fire dancers from the greater Chicago area and Great Lakes share their creative gifts by the shore of Lake Michigan, set to the percussive beats of local musicians, in this unique and free to the public monthly event taking place through Spring and into Fall.

If you find yourself in Chicago on August 10th at 7pm with nothing to do, you should check it out!

(All photos are credited to c|change designer/developer Paul Evangelista.)

Exploring Chicago by Boat

Sometimes, when it’s not winter, Chicago feels like the prettiest and most glorious city on earth. Yesterday, a few lucky c|changers got to spend the afternoon on one of our client’s (Shoreline Sightseeing) tour boats for a photo shoot. Check out the views from Shoreline’s architecture tour and their Lake Michigan tour. They are are even more glorious on the water.

Great Minds Dress Alike

Some days, when we get to work, we realize that we have a twin. Funny how that happens. 

Winging It
We were recently reading Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture by Erez Aiden and Jean Baptiste Michel. The authors were the ones who developed the Ngram Reader, a tool for mining all of the books currently scanned in by GoogleBooks. It’s provided (providing) fascinating insights into how language and culture have changed—and are likely to change.
But before you check out how the Ngram Reader works, there is a story about innovation that may have some bearing on how you are innovating…
Aiden and Michel revisit the story of the Wright Brothers and their “invention” of the airplane. Perhaps you already knew that the Wright Brothers were just two of hundreds—perhaps thousands—of individuals trying to apply the latest technology to flight.
Like stories of the automobile or radio, you can see how many other people, from many different countries, can be working on the same innovation, but someone makes The Leap. (Our term, not the authors’.)
Turns out that what allowed the Wright Brothers to make The Leap was that, while others were focused on making more and more powerful (re: heavier) engines, the Wright Brothers were focused on the wings and aerodynamics. (Maybe this had something to do with the fact they were bicycle makers?)
You can see the dilemma: with the rise of gasoline-powered engines, inventors were getting excited about the potentials to apply that power.
Before the Wright Brothers ever flew at Kitty Hawk, they created a wind tunnel, a way to prototype their wing designs to see which ones were more likely to fly. (Literally.) So when it came time to try out that unwieldy double-winged airplane of theirs, they had tested out different wings.
(Imagine the number of crashes they would have had to endure until they got the (w)right wings.)
The point of all of this? Sometimes the big idea demands taking a step back and taking apart the different element. The idea of Flight is not just launching something into the air (military experts had been doing that for years) or overcoming gravity (balloonists had been doing THAT for years), sometimes innovation means taking things apart and getting the pieces right.
For folks like us in marketing communications, we can talk about the next “killer app” but to get to the heart and soul of what we want to do, we must find ways to improve key components (even today, the most powerful turbine engines in the world can’t do the work alone).
It’s by getting smaller, essential elements right that our ideas can soar.
(P.S. Here’s a link to a Ted talk by the authors Michel and Aiden.)
 

 

Winging It

We were recently reading Uncharted: Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture by Erez Aiden and Jean Baptiste Michel. The authors were the ones who developed the Ngram Reader, a tool for mining all of the books currently scanned in by GoogleBooks. It’s provided (providing) fascinating insights into how language and culture have changed—and are likely to change.

But before you check out how the Ngram Reader works, there is a story about innovation that may have some bearing on how you are innovating…

Aiden and Michel revisit the story of the Wright Brothers and their “invention” of the airplane. Perhaps you already knew that the Wright Brothers were just two of hundreds—perhaps thousands—of individuals trying to apply the latest technology to flight.

Like stories of the automobile or radio, you can see how many other people, from many different countries, can be working on the same innovation, but someone makes The Leap. (Our term, not the authors’.)

Turns out that what allowed the Wright Brothers to make The Leap was that, while others were focused on making more and more powerful (re: heavier) engines, the Wright Brothers were focused on the wings and aerodynamics. (Maybe this had something to do with the fact they were bicycle makers?)

You can see the dilemma: with the rise of gasoline-powered engines, inventors were getting excited about the potentials to apply that power.

Before the Wright Brothers ever flew at Kitty Hawk, they created a wind tunnel, a way to prototype their wing designs to see which ones were more likely to fly. (Literally.) So when it came time to try out that unwieldy double-winged airplane of theirs, they had tested out different wings.

(Imagine the number of crashes they would have had to endure until they got the (w)right wings.)

The point of all of this? Sometimes the big idea demands taking a step back and taking apart the different element. The idea of Flight is not just launching something into the air (military experts had been doing that for years) or overcoming gravity (balloonists had been doing THAT for years), sometimes innovation means taking things apart and getting the pieces right.

For folks like us in marketing communications, we can talk about the next “killer app” but to get to the heart and soul of what we want to do, we must find ways to improve key components (even today, the most powerful turbine engines in the world can’t do the work alone).

It’s by getting smaller, essential elements right that our ideas can soar.

(P.S. Here’s a link to a Ted talk by the authors Michel and Aiden.)

 

 

New c|change inspiration

c|change is proud to announce a new acquisition. (No, not the guy on the right; that’s the artist, Ed Hinkley.)

That beautiful six-foot-by-six-foot wonder (the painting, not the artist) is called “The White Lake”.

It is just one part of a series Ed calls “Corporeal Landscapes” which integrates traditional landscapes and images from memory with glimpses of the human form. In this work, if you look closely, you will begin to make out faces throughout the snowy landscape.

Ed Hinkley is a native Chicagoan and over the last 30 years his work has been in numerous one-person, group, juried or invitational exhibitions in galleries and museums. “I’ve always approached my work as a kind of investigation driven by curiosity or concern,” he has said, “filtered through the haze of memory, historical event and the weight of cultural production.”

For us, it’ll be a daily inspiration for the work we do, navigating all kinds of landscapes.

If you’ve been reading our blog posts for the past two weeks, you know we’ve been counting down to the event we’re hosting at Chicago Artists Coalition tomorrow evening.
And if you haven’t been following, here’s an update: taking place over six weeks this past summer and into the fall, c|change worked with Better Boys Foundation in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago in a Design Lab that was part of the organization’s after-school art program. An introduction for many of the students to graphic design, the six-week Design Lab revolved around the development of one project: picking a topic that reflects an area where they’d like to see change take place (either globally, nationally or locally), crafting a compelling message and designing and producing a poster that illustrates their call to action.
Tomorrow six of these BBF students’ work will be on display at Chicago Artists Coalition and an awards ceremony will take place. The students will be in attendance. If you live in Chicago, are passionate about social change through art and design, please drop by to view the work and meet the young, passionate artists. The event starts at 5pm. More information here. We’d love to see you there!

If you’ve been reading our blog posts for the past two weeks, you know we’ve been counting down to the event we’re hosting at Chicago Artists Coalition tomorrow evening.

And if you haven’t been following, here’s an update: taking place over six weeks this past summer and into the fall, c|change worked with Better Boys Foundation in the Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago in a Design Lab that was part of the organization’s after-school art program. An introduction for many of the students to graphic design, the six-week Design Lab revolved around the development of one project: picking a topic that reflects an area where they’d like to see change take place (either globally, nationally or locally), crafting a compelling message and designing and producing a poster that illustrates their call to action.

Tomorrow six of these BBF students’ work will be on display at Chicago Artists Coalition and an awards ceremony will take place. The students will be in attendance. If you live in Chicago, are passionate about social change through art and design, please drop by to view the work and meet the young, passionate artists. The event starts at 5pm. More information here. We’d love to see you there!

Just two days to go until this awesome event c|change is hosting this Thursday, November 7th at 5pm at the Chicago Artists Coalition.
Check out the information and, if you’re a Chicagoan who is into how change can manifest in the world through art and design, we would love to see you there!

Just two days to go until this awesome event c|change is hosting this Thursday, November 7th at 5pm at the Chicago Artists Coalition.

Check out the information and, if you’re a Chicagoan who is into how change can manifest in the world through art and design, we would love to see you there!